Mosaic

Mosaic Set against the bustling backdrop of New York City and the exotic splendor of Jordan Mosaic is a story of love and betrayal of a clash of cultures and traditions and one woman s struggle to rebuild

  • Title: Mosaic
  • Author: Soheir Khashoggi
  • ISBN: 9780765312358
  • Page: 336
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Set against the bustling backdrop of New York City and the exotic splendor of Jordan, Mosaic is a story of love and betrayal, of a clash of cultures and traditions and one woman s struggle to rebuild her life.Like many working mothers, Dina Ahmed has become adept at juggling her family and her work She s the owner of Mosaic, a thriving floral design business, and has beSet against the bustling backdrop of New York City and the exotic splendor of Jordan, Mosaic is a story of love and betrayal, of a clash of cultures and traditions and one woman s struggle to rebuild her life.Like many working mothers, Dina Ahmed has become adept at juggling her family and her work She s the owner of Mosaic, a thriving floral design business, and has been blessed with success, beauty, and, most important, a happy family.But when she returns home one day to discover that her six year old twins have vanished, Dina is forced to admit that her life and her marriage were not as perfect as she d once believed After many desperate phone calls and anxious hours spent piecing the puzzle together Dina accepts the terrible truth Her husband, Karim, has taken the twins to his homeland of Jordan to raise the children with his family there.The authorities can do nothing to bring Dina s children back, and even her father s contacts in the U.S State Department are of little help Karim s family is wealthy and powerful, and even though Dina is half Arab herself, her options are limited.Distraught, but determined to fight, Dina travels to Jordan to confront her husband and to enact a desperate plan to get her children back but at what risk

    • Mosaic BY Soheir Khashoggi
      336 Soheir Khashoggi
    • thumbnail Title: Mosaic BY Soheir Khashoggi
      Posted by:Soheir Khashoggi
      Published :2019-06-18T15:00:59+00:00

    2 thoughts on “Mosaic

    1. Soheir Khashoggi is a Saudi Arabian writer A member of one of Saudi Arabia s most prominent families her brother is the illustrious millionaire Adnan Khashoggi and her father was the royal physician , she was born in Alexandria, Egypt, attended university in Beirut, Lebanon, and is now living in New York City She has published three novels, Mirage, Mosaic, and Nadia s Song.

    2. Pass this one. Better to read the more gripping Not Without My Daughter. The past few years have seen a not so unexpected surge of interest in Iranian, Iraqi, Afghani and you name it I have it Islam-kind of books. I confess I love reading such books. Offers a glimpse into a culture so different yet so similar to one I claim to belong to. But what is Mosaic? Ya ya, Dina Ahmadwakes up one day, finds that her husband, a Jordanian has taken their two kids and nanny to beloved Jordan. Boo hooing Dina [...]

    3. The blurb above gives you a fairly good idea about the family-saga. This book depicts the problems that are faced by Dina and Karim who live in New York. About the time of their marriage, Karim is more modern and has the modern views we link, but as years pass, his Jordanian values and ideas of family become more and more prominent. Dina on the other hand, even being half Arab herself is born and brought up in US, giving her the culture and attitude that most people admire. She painfully juggles [...]

    4. Tastefully written, the novel doesn't take sides and brings up a mother's anguish at being separated from her children against a father's conviction on raising his children as per his values. The taut storytelling keeps the suspense high throughout, and the plot twists are both surprising and realistic, as the author wisely avoids both thriller clichés and post-9/11 politics to engineer a series of believable, thought-provoking compromises.

    5. The storyline surely had hooked me and had me thinking as what's coming up next and also to the drastic stands people can take to do what they feel is right The story has a nice climax which ends with a reasonable and logical note. I loved reading it but felt its just an one timer .

    6. So I expected this book to be an updated, more "fair" (i.e. less biased, less prejudiced) version of the well-known "Not Without My Daughter" version of book. And to be fair, it is a better version. It's not as biased, not as prejudiced. I had high hopes, given that the author was born in Egypt and comes from a Saudi family. Unfortunately that didn't seem to matter in this book's case.At the beginning of the book you get a short introduction to Karim in a neutral way. And then later, there are * [...]

    7. Let me start by saying that before reading the book,I glanced at the author's introduction, which aroused my suspicions. For in my opinion, most of the Arab/Muslim authors are ever ready to ditch and sully their culture/religion in the mistaken belief that their experiences constitute and define the entire religion. So any sympathies I have for the person disappear instantly. Just as I expected, the novel read like a vendetta against the Arab world and beliefs. Dina seems to be a quite selfish l [...]

    8. So I got this book from a book expedition, I liked the idea of the connection of NY and Amman, I guess it was not a good book, nor a bad one, but it made me think of cultural differences and it's impact on relationships.So what is this book about? A rich Jordanian Muslim guy (not a committed Muslim since he drinks!!) who marries a Lebanese Christian lady, have three kids, and living in the U.S.After 11 of Sep. He started to feel the discrimination, and that he and his kids are not welcomed any m [...]

    9. bookcrossing/journal/5Basically a story of love and betrayal as one woman fights for her children. What made this interesting for me was the clash of cultures and traditions as it was set in New York and Jordan. Dina and Karim Ahmedare are from Lebanese and Jordain backgrounds, living in New York they appeared on the surface to have a happy marriage combined with successful careers and a family life together. Or so it seemed to Dina until one day her life is turned upside down when her husband v [...]

    10. BookList: Like her debut, Mirage (1995), Khashoggi’s second novel sculpts a broader understanding of Arab women’s lives, both in the Middle East and America. Dina Ahmed has it all, a happy family and flourishing floral-design business, but her world ruptures when she discovers that her husband, Karim, has kidnapped their eight-year-old twins from New York and returned with them to his homeland in Jordan. Dina enlists her good friends Sarah, a Jewish physician, and Emmeline, a “Creole Marth [...]

    11. it is absolutely a light romance reading for women. it didn't make me bored because I got a little bit of actions. the settings are in New York and Jordan not so long after 9/11. so you can guess now, there's something about Islam involved here. however, while it is a romance novel, the story actually tells about a broken household triggered by a man's ego and the suppressing situation for Muslims in U.S. after 9/11. while the wife of the broken household lives in misery after her twin children [...]

    12. I really like the way Soheir Khashoggi writes a novel. This story involves a couple who live in NYC with their family, The husband, Karim, originally from Jordan decides that living in the west is not in the best interest of his young children, and takes them back to Jordan, against the mothers consent.While this a heart wrenching experience for any parent to live through, the reader cannot hate Karim totally for what he has done as he is not portrayed as evil, but just someone who is a product [...]

    13. I enjoyed this book, has similarities to Brick Lane. Easy read. "Like many working mothers, Dina Ahmed has become adept at juggling her family and her work. She's the owner of Mosaic, a thriving floral design business, and has been blessed with success, beauty, and, most important, a happy family.But when she returns home one day to discover that her six-year-old twins have vanished, Dina is forced to admit that her life and her marriage were not as perfect as she'd once believed. After many des [...]

    14. Very poorly written book. Author promoted wrong culture and values. She promoted single parenting, sleeping around while still married, homosexuality, disrespect. There is good and bad in every culture and religion, but the author tried to portrayed American culture is the way of living but yet on other hand all the female characters in the book were miserable and lonely. Muslim culture and religion is not harsh by any means so please don't portray us like barbarians. We are very proud of our cu [...]

    15. At first it seemed like a good read, judging by its cover. Towards the end, only one word for it: disappointing. The only saving grace was a twist towards the end. Otherwise the writing is quite drab. Soheir, the author, tries hard to build characters. But at many moments she loses the plot in the process. It is a crash course on family values and individual rights. It is boring and mostly predictable. Many cliched ideas: a homosexual son to a conservative father, a struggling actor, some spice [...]

    16. A good read. Nothing sensational. The flow of the story was quite lifelike and realistic. Fluent writing. I liked that the story brings out the different perspectives, different points of views of the characters, which could be the result of their own contexts. The change in one's outlook, when one goes to a foreign land and is exposed to an alien culture and how one pines for his/her roots, comparing the two, is brought out beautifully and poignantly.The author brings in melodramatic situations [...]

    17. This book is about the cultural divide between the Middle East and the West. An American woman's Middle Eastern husband takes their children back home with him because he doesn't want them to be Americanized. She tries to get them back. I thought I would like it for strong characters and to learn about the culture, but it just wasn't written in a way that I liked or got an awful lot out of. It was kind of disappointing, but maybe that was the point of the story - life isn't always what you expec [...]

    18. Mosaic was just as good as her other book, Mirage. I love her writing and will definitely be checking out anything else she’s got out there.This one focused not only on the Arab-American family in the center of things, but also on how friendships can be awesome when they are made up of people from different backgrounds. I am making it sound WAY too simple, but I don’t want to give anything away.Another great book. Verdict: A

    19. The writing style is nice,easy to pass through pages quickly and the idea of having one's children taken away is indeed emotional, I found that in this book all conflicts wrapped up nicely, neatly with a less dramatic end.No doubt it doesn't beat the story of "Not without My daughter", couldn't resist myself without thoughts going over the book again while reading this one.I believe the climax could have been more engaging.

    20. What I liked the most about this book is that the husband who spirited his children away to his parent's home in Jordan isn't portrayed as "bad", but rather as conflicted. You realize from the beginning that he loves his children and is struggling to find the best way to protect them as they grow up in a post-9-eleven world. Unfortunately, he feels compelled to make his decision alone which highlights the death of his marriage.

    21. This was an amazing story! It's been sitting on my bookshelf for a while, it sort of got lost in there. Once I started, it was hard to put it down. The story of a family who appeared to be happy. One day, the mother comes home from work to discover that her husband has taken her twins to Jordan, and will not return. It's a heartbreaking story, especially when you are a mom. You can understand her anguish. The book is about her story. Does she get her kids back? Read it.

    22. I did mostly enjoy this book, especially the strong multi cultural friendship between the 3 women, and descriptive paragraphs of food and travel, but felt the ending was slightly lacking. Would Dina really find another boyfriend that quickly? It must be every woman's nightmare to find her children taken, and the storyline is satisfying in this respect, with a conclusion of sorts.

    23. An easy read. nice description on cultures and places in Jordan. Did not quite her point on bringing up issues of islam, christianity and gaye did not even paint a good picture of islam. sure, they are non practicing muslims. but reading and knowing this is quite disturbing. yet no solution?Am not very impressed, just a nice read ended with no satisfactory smile.

    24. While this book was good, I kept thinking about how "Not Without My Daughter" was great. I did want to know how it ended even though it felt watered down a great deal. I also don't believe the ending would have really happened.

    25. I ended up finishing the book after all but am wondering why I bothered. It will be in the thrift store box as it would be taking up space on my bookshelf which a much more deserving book could occupy.

    26. Great storyline about a mother who returns home only to find that her husband has taken their children to his home in the middle east. The story is told from the perspective of both parents and tells how far each of them is willing to go to protect that the children that they love.

    27. I'm putting an asterisk again---it was the condensed version. (Doug bought a bunch of Readers' Digest condensed books about 2 years ago and I pick them up when I have nothing else in the house to read. That is why I'm posting them now.) It was a good story.

    28. This book was overall good. The only down fall was the ending. It left so much unanswered at the end. Which I hate. I want the ending to wrapped up in a pretty little bow with no unanswered questions. It was still a very nice read however.

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