The Lyrics

The Lyrics Who was that stranger beside me Please forgive me for insistingIt must have been a dream No one could survive such happiness from Untitled The Lyrics records the days of one seeking knowledge through

  • Title: The Lyrics
  • Author: Fanny Howe
  • ISBN: 9781555974725
  • Page: 142
  • Format: Paperback
  • Who was that stranger beside me Please forgive me for insistingIt must have been a dream.No one could survive such happiness from Untitled The Lyrics records the days of one seeking knowledge through movement and contingent images a monastery, a motel, an Irish coastal river all the while conscious of political and class warfare, of beingWho was that stranger beside me Please forgive me for insistingIt must have been a dream.No one could survive such happiness from Untitled The Lyrics records the days of one seeking knowledge through movement and contingent images a monastery, a motel, an Irish coastal river all the while conscious of political and class warfare, of being American, of the need to know the difference if there is one between good and evil Each poem is a lament formed in a place of rest, asking Can we get beyond this and still be The Lyrics is the newest work of an intense and vital poet.

    • The Lyrics by Fanny Howe
      142 Fanny Howe
    • thumbnail Title: The Lyrics by Fanny Howe
      Posted by:Fanny Howe
      Published :2019-05-12T18:12:56+00:00

    2 thoughts on “The Lyrics

    1. from Fanny Howe is an American poet, novelist and short story writer.She was born in Boston, Massachusetts Her father was a lawyer and her mother, Mary Manning, was born in Dublin and wrote plays and acted for the Abbey Theatre before moving to the United States Her sister is the poet, Susan Howe and her daughter is the novelist, Danzy Senna 1 Howe is one of the most widely read of American experimental poets Her books include Selected Poems 2000 shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize , Forged 1999 , Q 1998 , One Crossed Out 1997 , O Clock 1995 , The End 1992 , and On the Ground 2004 also shortlisted for the Griffin Poetry Prize She has also published several volumes of prose, including Lives of the Spirit Glasstown Where Something Got Broken 2005 and The Wedding Dress Meditations on Word and Life 2003 , a collection of essays.Of her work, fellow poet Michael Palmer comments Fanny Howe employs a sometimes fierce, always passionate, spareness in her lifelong parsing of the exchange between matter and spirit Her work displays as well a political urgency, that is to say, a profound concern for social justice and for the soundness and fate of the polis, the city on a hill Writes Emerson, The poet is the sayer, the namer, and represents beauty Here s the luminous and incontrovertible proof.She is currently Professor Emerita of Writing and Literature at the University of California, San Diego.

    2. Frustrating. I wanted to like this book a lot more. I love Howe's essays and appreciated the extended form, but found the language a little flat (which is not my jam) and the declarations ("you'd need a science/to name this new species/that survives without language." or "There’s a long pause when a woman and a man/Struggle with equal strength.") and rhetorical questions (“How can this be happening?” “Will a new mistake produce better results?”) to be annoying and/or trite and/or reduc [...]

    3. Too hard. My little brain couldn't hold these long sequences, much less the whole book, together. I looked to the back cover for some help and found a little: "each poem is a lament formed in a place of rest." But is there rest? This speaker and these poems seem to walk around to so many disparate places, through different religions and ethics, with always an eye for social and political critique (often Marxist). I tried to take a cue from the title and read these strange poems as trying to get [...]

    4. I admire the breadth of idea in the book, and the continuity of intent, at least in the sense that I see scenarios juxtaposed to one another, or complemented as the book goes on. For instance, the situation and tone of "School" getting commented on in "City Limits" with the teacher whose insanity is its own teacher begins to pull the map for this book out. I guess I would have rather seen a bit more of those junctures. I really enjoy the moments when the speaker gets just a little more discursiv [...]

    5. There were some lovely parts to it but overall scribbling notes in the margins, trying to figure out half of the meanings was too much work.

    6. This gets a mere three stars ONLY by comparison to Fanny Howe's other books of the last decade. Compared to most poetry, it deserves at least eight out of five.

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